Llanblethian, Llanblethian Cottage 4312

Vale of Glamorgan, Wales

Brief Description

Watercolours from the 19th century show the garden's enclosing walls running up the hill behind the house. The house was demolished around 1900, and was replaced by the vicarage, but the garden walls remain.

Detailed Description

Watercolours from the 19th century show the garden's enclosing walls running up the hill behind the house. The house was demolished around 1900, and was replaced by the vicarage, but the garden walls remain.
Features

Plant Environment

  • Walled Garden
  • Environment
  • House (featured building)
  • Description: The house was demolished around 1900, and was replaced by the vicarage.
  • Garden Wall
  • Description: The enclosing walls remain intact.
History

Detailed History

Between 1809 and 1814, the house was inhabited by Edward and John Sterling. John Sterling later described it:

‘my home was built upon the slope of a hill, with a little orchard stretching down before it, and a garden rising behind...The narrow orchard, with its grove of old apple trees; the garden where I sowed flower seeds, and then turned up the ground again and planted potatoes, and then rooted out the potatoes to insert acorns and apple pips, and at last, as may be supposed, reaped neither roses, nor potatoes, nor oak-apples, nor apples...'.

The next tenant was from another wealthy family. Charles Courtenay planted ornamental trees and shrubs including Portuguese laurel, Persian lilacs, laburnum, spiraea, guilder roses, hypericum and phillyrea. Fruit trees included pears (winter Beure, swan egg and Chaumontelle). There were also double Gloucester cherries, greengages, a vine and a Moor Park apricot. The gardener was one William Davy, who was paid 2 shillings a day.

Period

  • Late 18th Century