Philips Park, Bury (also known as The Park, Whitefield)2618

Greater Manchester, England, Greater Manchester

Brief Description

Formed from the remnants of 19th-century formal gardens and associated woodland, Philips Park has been a public park since 1944. The site, which covers about 36 hectares, is managed as a nature reserve.

History

The estate was bought by Robert Philips in 1800, and retains elements of the 19th-century formal gardens and woodland.

Visitor Facilities

This site is a public park and nature reserve. Please see: http://www.bury.gov.uk/LeisureAndCulture/ParksAndRecreation/CountryParks/PrestwichForestPark/PhilipsPark.htm Telephone 0161 253 5353 (parks service).

Detailed Description

There was an enclosed garden with an early-19th-century conservatory. There was a temple (dating from the early-19th-century) on the high ground at the head of the Grass walk to the north. There was an icehouse dating from the early-19th-century.

There are two lodges. The first is South Wood Lodge (dating from the early-1800s). Four hundred metres to the south there is Philips Park Lodge (dating from the early-19th-century). This is 600 metres to the north of the site of the house.

There is wooded and steeply undulating terrain sloping roughly to the south-west, with the site of the house on a ridge giving fine views. There is a lawn to the south of the house. The site is roughly enclosed by shrubs and trees, rhododendron, beech sycamore and ash. There is also woodland of mainly mature trees traced by meandering paths.

A steeply sloping grass walk is the main axial feature, flanked by flowering shrubs, mainly rhododendron and azalea. There are mature trees behind. The park was affected by encroachment of the M62 motorway within the northern boundary Listed by English Heritage Register.

Features
  • Conservatory
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  • House (featured building)
  • Description: The Italianate mansion dates from around 1830, and was demolished in 1950.
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  • Walk
  • Description: A steeply sloping grass walk is the main axial feature, flanked by flowering shrubs, mainly rhododendron and azalea.
  • Temple
  • Description: There was a temple (dating from the early-19th-century) on the high ground at the head of the Grass walk to the north. It is not clear if this feature survives.
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  • Icehouse
  • Description: There was an icehouse dating from the early-19th-century. It is not clear if this feature survives.
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  • Gate Lodge
  • Description: There are two lodges. The first is South Wood Lodge (dating from the early-1800s).
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  • Gate Lodge
  • Description: Four hundred metres to the south of South Wood Lodge there is Philips Park Lodge (dating from the early-19th-century). This is 600 metres to the north of the site of the house.
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Gateway
Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

This site is a public park and nature reserve. Please see: http://www.bury.gov.uk/LeisureAndCulture/ParksAndRecreation/CountryParks/PrestwichForestPark/PhilipsPark.htm Telephone 0161 253 5353 (parks service).

Directions

The site is south of the M60 at junction 17.
History

Detailed History

Philips Park has the remnants of 19th-century formal gardens and associated woodland. The estate was bought by Robert Philips in 1800. It has been a public park since 1944. The Italianate mansion dates from around 1830, and was demolished in 1950. It was the home of the Philips family until 1946.
Contact

Telephone

01793 445050

Official Website

Click Here

Other websites

Owners

  • Bury Metropolitan Borough Council

    Town Hall, Knowsley Street, Bury, Lancashire, BL9 0SW
References

References

Contributors

  • Lancashire Gardens Trust

  • Greater Manchester Archaeological Unit