Knowlton Court, Nonington 1982

Canterbury, England, Kent, Dover

Brief Description

Knowlton Court has gardens and parkland associated with the Elizabethan principal building. The park extends to some 70 hectares, plus an extensive arable farm enterprise. The gardens cover around 1.5 hectares. The gardens were laid out in 1904 by Sir Reginald Blomfield. The grounds contain many smaller buildings which are now used as holiday 'lets', with The Lodge either built or re-designed by Lutyens in 1912. The main house is used as a wedding venue.

History

The gardens, although associated with the principal building, were laid out in 1904 by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

Detailed Description

The Speed family came to Knowlton in the 1890s and called in Sir Reginald Blomfield in 1904 to remodel the interior and some of the exteriors. He was also responsible for laying out the garden at this time, as well as the garden at Godinton. Areas around the house were used to make characteristic terraces and raised walks enclosed by battlemented yew hedges and balustrades, with flights of brick steps. There are gravel walks and grant wrought iron gates. The garden around the house is of architectural formality and simplicity.

The large walled garden to the south has a dominating monkey- puzzle (Araucaria araucana) that Blomfield presumably left or planted as a focal feature to the axis up the steps from the main garden. The walled garden has been divided into two. One half is grassed while the other is used to grow vegetables, including more unusual varieties. As far as possible, these are grown organically.

Blomfield probably also planted the fine approach lime avenue that runs north-west of the house from a circular forecourt to line up on the distant Chillenden windmill. Many of the limes fell in the 1987 storm but have been winched upright and pollarded in the hope of recovery. The Dower House to the east of the lime avenue is an attractive Flemish gabled 17th century building. The lodge at the end of the avenue is by Sir E Lutyens (1912). According to Newman, Lutyens was also asked to design a first plan of the drawing room in the main house in the same year.

Features
  • House (featured building)
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Walk
  • Description: Raised walks.
  • Hedge
  • Description: Battlemented yew hedges.
  • Gate
  • Description: Large wrought iron gates.
  • Specimen Tree
  • Description: The large walled garden to the south has a dominating monkey- puzzle.
  • Tree Avenue
  • Description: Blomfield probably also planted the fine approach lime avenue that runs north-west of the house from a circular forecourt to line up on the distant Chillenden windmill.
  • Gate Lodge
  • Description: The lodge at the end of the avenue is by Sir E Lutyens.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
Garden Terrace, Steps
Access & Directions

Directions

The site is in extreme east Kent. It is 2 miles west of Eastry, 6 miles west of Deal.
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Goodnestone
History

Detailed History

Knowlton Court is a secluded, restored Elizabethan house standing in its own park and grounds, with a fine approach avenue. It represents a major contribution to the heritage character of this part of east Kent, together with Goodnestone, Fredville and Waldershare.

The original house was red brick and essentially Elizabethan, previous owners including the P'Aeth family, the Cloudesley and Peytons (see the magnificent tombs in the nearby church), and the Langley family, who also owned much of this part of Kent.

Period

  • Early 20th Century (1901-1932)
Associated People
References

References