Holywells Park 7480

Ipswich, England, Suffolk, Ipswich

Brief Description

There is a series of linked ponds in the centre of the park, from where the water flows into the River Orwell.

History

Holywells House was built in the 19th century on the site of an old farmhouse. Its Victorian gardens were redesigned in the 20th century in accordance with the ideas of gardeners such as Gertrude Jekyll.

Visitor Facilities

The park is open from 7.30am Monday - Saturday and 9.00am on Sundays.

Detailed Description

Planting is in abeyance at the moment awaiting the reconstruction of the Grade 2 listed Orangery, from the late-19th century.
Features

Plant Environment

  • Arboretum
  • Plant Type

Style

  • English Landscape Garden
Summerhouse
Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

The park is open from 7.30am Monday - Saturday and 9.00am on Sundays.

Directions

Just North of the emerging Waterfront Area,between Nacton Road and Cliff Lane.
History

Detailed History

The park was originally part of the Manor of Wykes Bishop, held by the Bishops of Norwich from the 13th century. During the reign of Henry the VIII, the Manor was surrendered to the Crown and then granted to Sir John Jermy. The title of Lord of the Manor was aquired by John Cobbold in 1812.

During the 18th century a succession of Brewers worked in the park and used the waters to make beer. The Cobbold family had owned land at Holywells from 1689. They had begun their brewery in Harwich but had problems with the water there and for many years used ships to transport water from Holywells to Harwich and then to return to Ipswich with beer.

Holywells house was built in the 19th century on the site of an old farmhouse. Its Victorian gardens were redesigned in the 20th century in accordance with the ideas of gardeners such Gertrude Jekyll.