Feniscowles New Hall 5372

Feniscowles, England

Brief Description

Features of Feniscowles New Hall include entrance lodges, specimen trees, shrubs and a garden terrace. Feniscowles Old Hall is situated nearby on Links Lane, Pleasington, but is a farmhouse rather than an actual Hall. There is a considerable escarpment to the rear of the New Hall. Feniscowles Old Hall is sometimes referred to as Feniscowles Higher Hall because of this.

History

In 1812, Sir William Feilden built Feniscowles Hall on a piece of land surrounded on two sides by the River Darwen and protected at the rear by a steep rock face.

Detailed Description

Feniscowles New Hall has two entrance lodges and iron gates. There is a garden to the west of the Hall. Specimen trees, shrubs and a large lawn surround the Hall. There is also a low, garden terrace and a partially walled garden.
Features
  • Shrubbery
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Lawn
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Garden Terrace
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Garden Wall
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Gate Lodge
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Ironwork
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Gate
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • House (featured building)
  • Description: The house is now a ruin.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
History

Detailed History

The Manor of Feniscowles was purchased in 1798 by Sir William Feilden (13/3/1772 to 21/5/1850) from a Thomas Ainsworth. Sir William was the 3rd son of Joseph Feilden and Margaret Leyland of nearby Witton Park who made their fortune in the cotton industry. In 1812 he built Feniscowles Hall on a piece of land surrounded on two sides by the River Darwen and protected at the rear by a steep rock face.

Sir William, also a cotton manufacturer, became MP for Blackburn in 1832 - 1847 for both Liberal and latterly Conservative. He was ennobled in 1846 as 1st Baronet Feilden of Feniscowles. He died in 1850.

The 1851 census shows Lady Feilden and 9 servants at the Hall. The eldest son, William Henry succeeded to the Baronetcy but later bitterly complained about the pollution that was fouling the River Darwen. He lost a long dispute with the Local Health Board and moved to Scarborough in 1877, dying in 1879.

The Hall remained empty for some time with attempts made to use it for functions such as weddings. By 1930 it was left to decay and this was exacerbated with the advent of World War 2 when lead from the roof was used for the war effort. Decay continued leaving the ruined shell that remains today.

Detailed history added 19/11/2013

Period

  • Victorian (1837-1901)