Clovelly Court 4332

Bideford, Torridge, Devon, England

Brief Description

The garden is a classic example of the Victorian kitchen garden tradition.

History

In 1796 Rev John Swete wrote 'the grounds had a fine natural fall to the sea and were charmingly diversified, with hill and vale, open glades and ancient woods.'

Visitor Facilities

The gardens are open from April to September, from 10am to 4pm.

Detailed Description

The garden is a classic example of the Victorian kitchen garden tradition, currently undergoing a major renovation of the fine range of lean-to greenhouses and the re-introduction of tender fruit species. The walled garden is also now used extensively for market gardening. Old roses and shrubs are displayed in the garden behind the house. The terraces also enjoy views over Bideford Bay.

The gardens are regularly open for visitors.

Features

Plant Environment

  • Walled Garden
  • Environment
  • Wall
  • Description: Stone kitchen garden wall
  • Greenhouse
  • Description: Five greenhouses
  • Terrace
  • Lawn
  • Walk
  • Description: Long walk.
Herbaceous Border
Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

The gardens are open from April to September, from 10am to 4pm.
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Clovelly
History

Detailed History

Clovelly Court was the seat of the Carys, then of the Hamlyns. A house has stood on the site for over 600 years. Following a fire in 1789, an elegant Gothic Georgian wing was built in the same year. This wing was badly burnt in 1943, leaving the most ancient, albeit plain remains.

The parkland extends over 10 hectares, with fine views over Bideford Bay. The Hobby Drive was constructed by Hamlyn in 1829, offering an alternate carriageway approach through oak woodlands to the picturesque village of Clovelly.

In 1796 Rev John Swete wrote ‘the grounds had a fine natural fall to the sea and were charmingly diversified, with hill and vale, open glades and ancient woods.' A diarist in 1823 noted that the ‘romantic' grounds had a summer-house called ‘The Cabin' which was ‘too grand to attempt description'. He also noted that Lucombe had supplied mountain ashes with yellow and orange berries, as well as others with white, pale and dark red berries. These trees were a feature of the Hobby Drive. White (1850) noted that it was a ‘large and handsome seat . . .the views from the house are extremely grand.'

Contact
References

References