Chesworth House 5276

Crawley, England, West Sussex, Horsham

Brief Description

The gardens are mainly the work of Captain Cook in the 1920s and 1930s. They are reputed to be very beautiful and use the moat to form the basis for the water gardens. Small waterfalls create a number of fish ponds.

History

Chesworth was one of the three deer parks owned by William de Braose, lord of the Rape of Bramber, the others being Denne Park and Sedgwick Park. There are substantial parts of the Tudor house still existing and incorporated into the newer buildings.

Detailed Description

The moat forms part of the site of the original house, to the south of the present one. There are substantial parts of the Tudor house still existing and incorporated into the newer buildings.

The gardens are mainly the work of Captain Cook in the 1920s and 1930s. They are reputed to be very beautiful and use the moat to form the basis for the water gardens. Small waterfalls create a number of fish ponds. Bridges link the various parts: low walls, lawns, rock gardens, shrubbery and herbaceous border. The River Arun runs through the property.

Given the remarkable history of this site and the obviously excellent standard of the pre-war gardens, this garden deserves close attention by English Heritage.

Features
  • Moat
  • Description: The moat forms part of the site of the original house, to the south of the present one. The moat forms the basis for the water gardens.
  • Manor House (featured building)
  • Description: There are substantial parts of the Tudor house still existing and incorporated into the newer buildings.
  • Waterfall
  • Description: Small waterfalls create a number of fish ponds.
  • Fishpond
  • Description: There are a number of fish ponds.
  • River
  • Description: The River Arun runs through the property.
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Southwater
History

Detailed History

Chesworth was one of the three deer parks owned by William de Braose, lord of the Rape of Bramber, the others being Denne Park and Sedgwick Park. There are close links with many important families, including the Howards. Catherine Howard, later to be wife of Henry VIII, lived at Chesworth with her grandmother. Her uncle, the Duke of Norfolk was instrumental in arranging her royal marriage. It was her conduct while at Chesworth that formed part of the charges against her before she was beheaded.

Period

  • Early 20th Century (1901-1932)
Contact

Telephone

01793 445050

Official Website

Click Here

Owners