Bramshott Churchyard 9546

Haslemere, England, Hampshire, East Hampshire

Brief Description

Close to the church is the memorial cross designed by Inigo Triggs facing plot 1 in which the first of the Canadian victims are buried. Beyond this are plots 2 & 3 where the 318 Canadian soldiers lie. Between the two plots is Reginald Blomfield’s war memorial facing a double hedge of clipped yew and beech.

History

The cemetery was extended westwards in 1908. A further extension took place in 1917 for the local victims of World War 1. A year later it provided a further burial ground for 318 Canadian soldiers who died as a result of the 1918 Spanish influenza epidemic.

Detailed Description

Situated north of the London - Portsmouth A3 road, above the River Wey's raised terrace on gently sloping land with views west to Woolmer Forest. A footpath runs west from the church which is surrounded by the earliest burials, to the extended graveyard. Close to the church is the memorial cross designed by Inigo Triggs facing plot 1 in which the first of the Canadian victims are buried. Beyond this are plots 2 & 3 where the 318 Canadian soldiers lie. Between the two plots is Reginald Blomfield's war memorial facing a double hedge of clipped yew and beech.

The Churchyard is well maintained by the Parochial Church Council with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission being responsible for maintaining the Canadian War Graves section. Earlier photos show heather planted on each grave but at the time of writing there is little planting to be seen. The Canadian graves all have headstones depicting a maple leaf.

Detailed description contributed by Hampshire Gardens Trust 16/12/2015

Features
  • War Memorial
  • Description: Close to the church is the memorial cross designed by Inigo Triggs facing plot 1.
  • War Memorial
  • Description: Between plots 2 and 3 is Reginald Blomfield's war memorial facing a double hedge of clipped yew and beech.
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Bramshott and
History

Detailed History

The Church of St Mary was originally built in 1220 as a private chapel for Bramshott Manor and by the end of the 19th century a graveyard had been established to the west of it. Extended westwards in 1908, a further extension took place in 1917 for the local victims of WWI. A year later it provided a further burial ground for 318 Canadian soldiers who died as a result of the 1918 Spanish influenza epidemic.

The first burials took place in Plot 1, part of the original churchyard, but this was then extended to include plots 2 and 3 with a war cross between the two plots. Inigo Triggs designed the extension and Reginald Blomfield the memorial cross. In 1920 another memorial cross was erected west of the church, designed by Inigo Triggs, to honour local men. After the end of WWI the government planted maple trees along the eastern boundary of Bramshott church to honour the Canadians who died.

Detailed history contributed by Hampshire Gardens Trust 16/12/2015

Period

  • Early 20th Century
Associated People

People associated to Bramshott Churchyard

Contact

Official Website

Click Here

Owners

  • Anglican Diocese of Portsmouth

References

Contributors

  • Hampshire Gardens Trust

  • S Carey-Thomas