Ashdown Place 7165

Forest Row, Wealden, East Sussex, England

Brief Description

A plan of ‘Ashdown Place’ garden is shown in Walter Godfrey’s ‘Gardens in the Making’. The formal garden was based on a cruciform-shaped plan, leading south-east from the house, with a series of lawns, a rose garden and an upper terrace. When the property was split into individual units, the garden was divided into long sections running north-west to south-east. Nothing remains of the original rose garden and there is now a sunken pool and terrace near the house where the lawn once existed.

History

‘Ashdown Place’ was known previously as ‘Ashdown Cottages’. The 1842 Tithe map of the site shows two small cottages, pastures, arable land, orchard and meadows. Alterations were made to the property and in 1901 the house was re-named ‘Ashdown Place’. Fitzroy Chapman bought the site in 1924. He extended the house over the next few years and instructed Walter Godfrey to lay out the garden.

Detailed Description

A plan of ‘Ashdown Place' garden is shown in Walter Godfrey's ‘Gardens in the Making'. The formal garden was based on a cruciform-shaped plan, leading south-east from the house, with a series of lawns, a rose garden and an upper terrace. The bowling green alley bisected the plan to form the cross-member. Contrasting with the formality of this garden were encircling areas of informal planting of trees set within lawns. A kitchen garden existed previously, sited to the east of the rose garden.

When the property was split into individual units, the garden was divided into long sections running north-west to south-east. Nothing remains of the original rose garden and there is now a sunken pool and terrace near the house where the lawn once existed. The bowling alley still remains.

Features
  • Pool
  • Description: Sunken pool.
Bowling Green, Terrace
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Forest Row
History

Detailed History

‘Ashdown Place' was known previously as ‘Ashdown Cottages'. The 1842 Tithe map of the site shows two small cottages, pastures, arable land, orchard and meadows, all farmed by the Underwood family.

By the time of the 1881 Census, Henry Stack, barrister, and his family were the occupants. By 1900 it was owned and lived in briefly by D.W. Freshfield whilst building his new house ‘Pressridge' (now ‘Wych Cross Place'). His architect son-in-law, E. Fisher, made alterations to the property and in 1901 the house was re-named ‘Ashdown Place'.

Between 1911 and 1922, it appears to have been let to Col. The Hon. H.A. Lawrence. In 1924, D.W. Freshfield sold ‘Ashdown Place' to Fitzroy Chapman for £11,000. Fitzroy Chapman, a director of a chemical manufacturer, extended the house over the next few years and instructed Walter Godfrey to lay out the garden. Five gardeners were employed. Fitzroy Chapman was a keen bowls player and had a bowling alley lawn designed within the garden. This alley was also used by his local club. He died in 1953 and the property was sold to an Ada Gibbon, who subsequently divided the house into eight separate units with a bungalow built into the far south-east of the garden.

Period

  • Early 20th Century
Associated People

Just one person associated to Ashdown Place

References

References

Contributors

  • H.C. May

    1

  • Sussex Gardens Trust