Wyards Farm 4870

Basingstoke, East Hampshire, Hampshire, England

Brief Description

This is an early example of a private house influenced by the architectural style of Wolvesey Palace in Winchester. Having been owned and let by Winchester College until the 1950s, it retains many of the original features. The garden is typical of a country farm and is notable for having been painted by Anna Lefroy, who lived here in 1815 and was a favourite niece of Jane Austen.

History

The manor was re-built in 1691 by Robert Kercher, the son of a clergyman. The house with 130 acres of land was offered for sale in 1952 and was bought by talented gardeners who planted extensively, creating a white garden and a secret garden, whilst keeping the feeling of a cottage garden.

Detailed Description

The house with 130 acres of land was offered for sale in 1952 and was bought by talented gardeners who planted extensively, creating a white garden and a secret garden, whilst keeping the feeling of a cottage garden. Much of this planting remains in evidence. There are wide herbaceous borders, beech hedges and specimen trees including a Davidia (handkerchief tree) and a liriodendron Tulipifera (tulip tree). The Victorian ha-ha has been removed and a wider lawn created but the round pond at the front of the house has been reinstated and planted with aquatics. A rectangular pond has also been created on the south front.
Features
  • Herbaceous Border
  • Description: In 1952, gardeners planted a wide herbaceous border that surrounded the garden.
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  • Hedge
  • Description: The beech hedges throughout Wyards Farm garden were planted in 1952.
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  • Pond
  • Description: The round pond at the front of the house has been reinstated and planted with aquatics. A rectangular pond has also been created on the south front.
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  • Manor House (featured building)
  • Description: It is described by Edward Roberts as an `innovative and transitional building? and `reflects what the families of minor country gentlemen and clergy were coming to expect?.It also shows how local builders, familiar with earlier traditions, were struggling to master the new symmetrical form. For example, the builder of Wyards gave the front six bays so that it was impossible to place the front door in an exact central position.? (Hampshire Field Club Newsletter 39 p10-11)
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  • Specimen Tree
  • Description: There are specimen trees including a Davidia (handkerchief tree) and a liriodendron Tulipifera (tulip tree).
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Beech
History

Detailed History

The present house sits on the site of an older manor. There are references to the Wyard family as early as the 13th century. It was owned for many years by Winchester College and the tenants are well-documented in the college records.

The manor was re-built in 1691 by Robert Kercher, the son of a clergy-man, who must have been familiar with the bishop's new house at Wolvesey in Winchester. It is described by Edward Roberts as an ‘innovative and transitional building' and ‘reflects what the families of minor country gentlemen and clergy were coming to expect....It also shows how local builders, familiar with earlier traditions, were struggling to master the new symmetrical form. For example, the builder of Wyards gave the front six bays so that it was impossible to place the front door in an exact central position.' (Hampshire Field Club Newsletter 39 p10-11)

After his death the house was occupied by several people including, in 1815, the Reverend Benjamin Lefroy and his wife Anna, a favourite niece of Jane Austen who lived nearby and was a frequent visitor. During her time at Wyards, Anna Lefroy painted the house and garden and the view she chose is little changed today.

Associated People

Just one person associated to Wyards Farm

Contact

Telephone

01793 445050

Official Website

Click Here
References

Contributors

  • Hampshire Gardens Trust

  • Sheila Carey-Thomas

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