Nettlestead Place 2392

Maidstone, England, Kent, Maidstone

Brief Description

The house was re-built between 1920 and 1922 replacing the earlier structure, the oldest part dating to 1250. The gardens in their current form were established during this period of re-building. The gardens now include a sunken garden, herbaceous borders, ponds, lawns, canals and a rose garden.

History

Between 1920 and 1922 a Mr Vinson largely rebuilt the house, and restarted the gardens which the present owner is rejuvenating and extending.

Visitor Facilities

http://www.nettlesteadplace.co.uk/gardens/index.html

Detailed Description

To the south of the house is a large square sunken pond garden surrounded by a 1.5 metre wall of ragstone topped by boxwood hedges. The pond is fed by a natural spring, and there are to be found many interesting water and bog plants.

To the east of the house is a fine gravelled terrace overlooking a daffodil lawn and small man-made canals fed from the pond. This leads to a natural valley where it is intended to construct a glen garden using streams and small water falls.

To the north of the house is a small square garden divided into four by boxwood and yew hedges, containing herb and salad gardens and soft fruit for use in the kitchen.

To the west of the pond garden is an extensive rose and herbaceous garden centred around a 300 year old lime tree. It is planned to add many more varieties and species of roses to this garden by removing the herbaceous borders to a specially selected formal area of the gardens further south and west. At the north end of the rose garden is a small intimate woodland area with many varieties of shade-loving plants.

To the south of the pond and rose gardens, the garden is dominated by an area of four recently planted island beds, the largest of which is some 1000 square metres in area, containing an extensive range of plants, trees and shrubs.

The garden as a whole is on many levels, being on a slope leading down to the River Medway. The features of the gardens have been planned to provide specific vistas of open countryside beyond, and views of the house, gatehouse and adjoining church.

Ragstone walls have been re-built and new walls made, and together with established hedges of beech, box and yew, make fitting places for narrow borders of ground-cover plants especially the many varieties of hardy geranium. The walls themselves support a range of unusual tender plants and climbers.

Other developments are planned, including a glasshouse for the growing of more tender species.

Features
  • Pond
  • Description: To the south of the house is a large square sunken pond garden surrounded by a 1.5 metre wall of ragstone topped by boxwood hedges. The pond is fed by a natural spring, and there are to be found many interesting water and bog plants.
  • Ornamental Canal
  • Description: Small man-made canals fed from the pond.
  • House (featured building)
  • Description: The house was largely re-built in the early 1920s.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Garden Terrace
  • Description: Gravelled terrace.
  • Lawn
  • Description: Daffodil lawn.
  • Kitchen Garden
  • Description: To the north of the house is a small square garden divided into four by boxwood and yew hedges, containing herb and salad gardens and soft fruit for use in the kitchen.
  • Specimen Tree
  • Description: Lime tree.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Island Bed
  • Description: To the south of the pond and rose gardens, the garden is dominated by an area of four recently planted island beds, the largest of which is some 1000 square metres in area, containing an extensive range of plants, trees and shrubs.
Herbaceous Border, Rose Garden
Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

http://www.nettlesteadplace.co.uk/gardens/index.html

Directions

The site is adjacent to the parish church, directly to the south of the centre of Nettlestead village. Access is from the B2015.
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Nettlestead
History

Detailed History

The original house was built in 1250. Its associated small estate flourished until the mid-17th century. It was then abandoned until 1920, and only a large walnut tree and lime tree remain in the garden as relics of the original grounds. Between 1920 and 1922 a Mr Vinson largely rebuilt the house, and restarted the gardens which the present owner is rejuvenating and extending.

Period

  • Early 20th Century (1901-1932)
References

References