Bedfield Hall 6922

Woodbridge, Mid Suffolk, Suffolk, England

Brief Description

Bedfield Hall and its outbuildings and kitchen garden are surrounded by a moat. The entrance is to the west. The house lies on the south of the site with the kitchen garden to the north and the outbuildings to the west of the kitchen garden. At the eastern end of the site, part of the moat narrows to form a ditch on the east and south side forming a wooded island with the Nuttery on about a third of the area. North of it is another small island. To the west outside the moat is a small orchard on a raised area.

History

Robert Keriche occupied the house in the 16th century. He died in 1577 and left a will. His son Thomas died and left a will in 1591. Evidence in timbers in the house.

Visitor Facilities

The site can only be visited by pre-arranged tour groups.

Detailed Description

Bedfield Hall is a Manor House situated in Mid-Suffolk. It is a two acre site. Its outbuildings and kitchen garden are surrounded by a moat. The causeway is to the west. The house lies to the south of the site with the kitchen garden to the north and the outbuildings to the west of the kitchen garden. At the eastern end of the site, part of the moat narrows to form a ditch on the east and south side, around a wooded island with a nuttery. The Nuttery covers about one third of the island to the north. To the north of this is another small island. West of the site, outside the moat is a small orchard on a raised area.

Features

Plant Environment

  • Flower Garden
  • Plant Type

Style

  • Formal
Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

The site can only be visited by pre-arranged tour groups.

Directions

Off A1120 northwards at Earl Soham and left at cemetery 3 miles approx to Bedfield and turn right at the telephone box.
History

Detailed History

There has been a house on the site since about 1080. The main evidence is from a dendrochronological survey of the Hall in the early 1980s.

Two generations of the Kerriche family lived there in the 16th century. Two generations left wills and an inventory which showed how the spaces in the house changed. The final plan of the house by the 17th cenury showed a late medieval core flanked by two wings. This was probably carried out by Thomas Dunstan together with other considerable modifications to the Hall.

There are a few photographs from the early-20th century which illustrate clearly how the hall has evolved.

When the current owners Timothy and Christine Easton acquired the Hall in 1982, it had been empty for eighteen months. The garden was very overgrown. There were lovely trees but otherwise they redesigned the garden saving at least one rose "Felicite Perpetue" which was found scrambling around the front south bank of the moat.

References

Contributors

  • Chloe Bennett

    1

  • Ann Bennoch

    1