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Hush Heath Manor (also known as Husheath Manor)

Introduction

Hush Heath Manor has gardens that were restored in the 20th century, set in a wider landscape of wood and parkland. The gardens include formal terraced lawns, Italian-style gardens, orchards and vineyards. The site is now mainly used for wine and apple juice production.

The site has a Tudor, timber-framed house and gatehouse gazebo (possibly a 20th century fake). The Italian-style garden was created in the l930s by Mr Bower. The garden covers about 1.5 hectares, comprising a series of small gardens, divided by terracing, walks, hedges, topiary, avenues and walls.

The focal feature of the garden is the ornate clipped cypress amphitheatre, decorated with statuary and urns. Leading from this is an avenue of tall Irish yews, bound into a conical shape with twine. At the far end of this grass walk is a statue (a replacement for an exquisite white marble ‘Rebecca', which is now in the house). Another walk runs parallel to this, with stone pillars and old roses, culminating in wrought-iron gates.

A wild wooded valley falls away below this walk, with naturalised camellias, bluebells and primroses.

To the south of the house, there is a charming sunken lawn, with an old apple trees and silver beds. There is also a bog garden or dell in the south-east corner of the garden, planted with architectural species. To the south of the main garden is a well-maintained and attractive kitchen garden, softened with shrub and climbing rose wigwam posts.

Exceptionally fine planting detail in the best English tradition enhances the fine atmosphere created by the strong Italian framework of the garden. To the west of the kitchen garden is an old barn with a tennis court and plans for a swimming pool. In 1980 a new addition was built. This consists of a raised brick-structured circular herb garden with a fountain, to the north face of the house. This was designed by A de Gard Pasley.

Visitor Access, Directions & Contacts

Directions

The site is three miles south-west of Staplehurst off the A229.

Owners

Mr Balfour-Lynn

Associated People
Features & Designations

Designations

  • The National Heritage List for England: Register of Parks and Gardens

  • Reference: GD1932
  • Grade: II

Features

  • Pond
  • Description: A Japanese-style pond
  • Statue
  • Description: There are statues in the Italian area of the gardens
  • Terrace
  • Lawn
  • Orchard
  • Description: An extensive commercial apple orchard, growing Cox's Orange Pippin, Bramley Seedling and Egremont Russet. The apples are grown naturally, using traditional growing techniques. The orchards are also home to wild flowers, so as to attract natural predators to protect the crops from pests.Hush Heath Apple Juice was a gold medal winner at the National Fruit Show Competition in 2006.
  • House (featured building)
  • Description: The site has a Tudor, timber-framed house and gatehouse gazebo.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Amphitheatre
  • Description: The focal feature of the garden is the ornate clipped cypress amphitheatre, decorated with statuary and urns.
  • Tree Avenue
  • Description: Tall Irish yews.
  • Walk
  • Description: There are several grass walks.
  • Lawn
  • Description: To the south of the house, there is a charming sunken lawn.
  • Planting
  • Description: There is a raised brick-structured circular herb garden with a fountain, to the north face of the house.
Key Information

Type

Estate

Purpose

Food/drink production

Principal Building

House

Survival

Extant

Hectares

4.5

Civil Parish

Staplehurst

References

References