Summary

Site is open to the public. Opening may be limited, please check Visitor Information for any restrictions.

Part/component area of: Wimpole Hall

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Brief description of site

Features of Wimpole Home Farm include horse stables, pigsties, various yards and a dairy. Several of the farm buildings are listed grade II or II*.

Brief history of site

Wimpole Home Farm was created in the late-18th century as a model farm. It was designed for the third Lord Hardwicke by Sir John Soane.

Location information:

Address: Arrington, Royston, SG8 0BW

Locality: Cambridge

Local Authorities:

Cambridgeshire; South Cambridgeshire; Wimpole

Historical County: Cambridgeshire

OS Landranger Map Sheet Number: 154 Grid Ref: TL341514
Latitude: 52.1446 Longitude: -0.0416873

Key information:

Form of site: garden

Purpose of site: Food/drink production

Context or principal building: farm

Site first created: 1790 to 1806

Main period of development: Late 18th century

Survival: Extant

Description

Soane’s plan of 1796 incporporated a large barn, cow stalls, stables for the worked horses, pigsties, cart sheds, a slaughter area and a dairy. A series of deer pens were built as the herd at Wimpole suffered a rare disease in 1794. In 1860 an octagonal dairy and farm-house were built.

Although the layout as proposed by Soane was not built to his plan, and several individual buildings have been demolished, what remains gives a good impression of a model farm located within the park.

The byre and fold yards represent the need for shelter for cows. But as more cows were kept, a middle range was built and the rick yard was made into fold yards for the cattle. The cartsheds are open fronted and built for eight carts and two waggons, but by 1834 space for 15 carts was required. The barn was completed in 1796.

The barn now houses the museum, and is thatched with double entrances opening on to threshing floors. The stables for the 15 working horses were also used for ploughs and cart traces. The fields immediately around the Home Farm are now used for grazing rare breeds of farm animals, which are in danger of extinction.

Owner: The National Trust

Heelis, Kemble Drive, Swindon

Principal building:

Farm House Created 1860

Visitor facilities

Opening contact details:

The farm is open daily between February and October, and weekends only in the winter.
http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/wimpole-estate/opening-times/

External web site link: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/wimpole-estate/

External web site link: http://www.wimpole.org/

History

Between 1790 and 1806 Philip Yorke, 3rd Earl of Hardwicke commissioned various work at Wimpole Hall by Sir John Soane. Yorke was passionately interested in farming and the estate soon became well known for its progressive agriculture. Soane designed the agricultural buildings for Yorke’s model farm. This was built to the north-east of the Hall so that Yorke could keep his eye on the farm.

People associated with this site

Designer: Sir John Soane (born 10/09/1753 died 20/01/1837)

Features

stable block

Feature created: 1796

The stables for the 15 working horses were also used for ploughs and cart traces.

dairy

Feature created: 1860

building

The barn now houses the museum, and is thatched with double entrances opening on to threshing floors.

References

Organisations associated with this site

Cambridgeshire Gardens Trust

The National Trust Role: Owner

Contributor or Recorder Cambridgeshire Gardens Trust

Images

  • Wimpole Hall, the home farm

    Wimpole Hall, the home farm