Use Places & People to search over 6,600 parks and gardens in the UK and 2,100 biographies of people associated with them. Image location: Bedgebury National Pinetum

Learn about the rich heritage of parks and gardens in Topics.
Image location: Powis Castle

Follow News & Events, updated regularly with the latest information affecting historic parks and gardens. Image location: Sheffield Botanical Gardens

Visit the Schools for ideas and activities to encourage the interest of children and young people in their local parks. Image location: Trentham

Join us as a volunteer and Research & Record historic parks and gardens in your area.
Image location: Cirencester Abbey

View the Illustrated Glossary which provides definitions and accompanying images for terms and concepts associated with historic parks and gardens. Image location: Pannett Park

The following is from the Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest. For the most up-to-date Register entry, please visit the The National Heritage List for England (NHLE):

www.historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list

HISTORIC DEVELOPMENT

The Hall Barn estate was conveyed to the poet and statesman Edmund Waller (1606-1687) and his mother in 1624. He was banished from England in 1644 for his role in the Oxford or 'Waller Plot', which tried to secure Oxford for King Charles I, subsequently living on the Continent and visiting places such as Venice and Paris with the diarist John Evelyn, until he was pardoned in 1651 and returned to Hall Barn. Waller is thought to have started his gardening activity soon after his return, continuing until his death in 1687, and building himself a new house before 1675. His son, Edmund Waller II, lived at Hall Barn 1687-1708, but did not carry out significant alterations to the landscape. Edmund II's son, Edmund Waller III, carried out a significant phase of landscape improvements from about 1713, when John Aislabie (who created Studley Royal, North Yorkshire,) married Edmund III's mother. Edmund III inserted a range of garden buildings and ornaments into Edmund I's established landscape framework, continuing until about 1740. He died in 1771, to be followed at Hall Barn by his son and grandson, Edmund IV and V respectively. In 1832 the estate was sold out of the family to Sir Gore Ousley Bt, of Claremont, Hertfordshire, who carried out further developments to the house and estate until his death in 1844. Edward Levy-Lawson, first Lord Burnham, bought the estate in 1880 and immediately began to enlarge the house and rework the gardens, continuing work until about 1910. The M40 motorway was sunk across the northern park in the early 1970s, separating the main entrance from the house and the majority of the site, now joined only by a bridge across the motorway. The storms of 1987 and 1990 felled many mature woodland trees, to devastating effect, particularly in The Grove, and the landscape is currently (1997) undergoing restoration. The estate remains in private ownership

Site timeline

1846 to 1879: The Hargreaves family were in occupation from around 1846 until the late-1870s.

1970 to 1975: The M40 motorway was sunk across the northern park in the early 1970s, separating the main entrance from the house and the majority of the site, now joined only by a bridge across the motorway.

1987 to 1990: The storms of 1987 and 1990 felled many mature woodland trees, to devastating effect, particularly in The Grove.

People associated with this site

Designer: John Aislabie (born 04/12/1670 died 1742)

Architect: T. A. Bird

Architect: Colen Campbell (born 1676 died 1729)

Architect: George Devey (born 23/02/1820 died 04/11/1886)

Features

stream

The stream runs through the site from north to south.