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The original Crowe Hall was built around 1760. It was re-built around 1800 and the house and garden have been considerably re-modelled since then, particularly by an Italophile owner around 1871.

A sketch by Thomas Robins, now in the Hohler Collection at the Courtauld Institute, shows Crowe Hall standing in an 18th century landscape.

The following is from the Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest. For the most up-to-date Register entry, please visit the The National Heritage List for England (NHLE):

www.historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list

HISTORIC DEVELOPMENT

Crowe Hall was built in about 1760 for Brigadier Crowe, and a late 18th century sketch by Thomas Robins (Courtauld Institute) shows it set in informal parkland.

In the early 19th century the estate was bought by George Hayward Tugwell, who rebuilt the house and laid out the basic framework for a formal terraced garden.

During the 1870s, under the ownership of Henry Tugwell, both house and garden were remodelled. In 1874 Henry Tugwell appointed William Carmichael (about 1816-1904) as head gardener, who was responsible for a series of alterations to the gardens. Carmichael was trained at the Edinburgh Botanic Gardens, and had previously been head gardener to the Prince of Wales at Sandringham, Norfolk in the 1860s.

Crowe Hall remained the property of the Tugwell family until 1919, when it was sold. It then changed hands several times before being purchased by Sir Sydney Barratt in 1960. The latter developed the garden further, and collected various statues and ornaments for it.

The site remains (2001) in private ownership.

Site timeline

1926: The west front of the house was entirely re-built after a serious fire.

People associated with this site

Gardener: William Carmichael (born 1816 died 1904)

Features

garden building

Feature created: 1851

Log shed.

greenhouse

Feature created: 1852

The greenhouses are in bad condition and in need of attention. One is dated 1852.

orangery

Feature created: 1880 to 1889

The orangery is at the west end of the house, and was built in the 1880s.

Designation status: The National Heritage List for England: Listed Building Designation Grade II

garden house

Feature created: 1854

This feature is a picturesque Gothic cottage, originally built for the chief gardener.

Designation status: The National Heritage List for England: Listed Building Designation Grade II

pool

lawn

This feature is the meadow. It is enclosed by an iron railing and let out to a local farmer.

courtyard

This feature is the mulberry courtyard. It is a secluded garden to the north-west of the house.

courtyard

This feature is the nut courtyard. It is a secluded garden to the north-west of the house.

terrace

The upper terrace is the central garden feature. It is a neatly maintained rectangular shaped formal garden adjoining the south side of the house. Steps lead from the house down to the lawn, which has a pond in the middle. The balustrades were brought from Queen's Square.

garden building

Feature created: 1760 to 1799

This feature is the coach house. It dates to the late 18th century. It has been considerably altered and is now converted into flats.

Designation status: The National Heritage List for England: Listed Building Designation Grade II

grotto

Below the upper terrace are the remains of the grotto. It is now overgrown and has lost some of its stonework. It is made of tufa stone and studded with shells and ammonites.

water feature

By the grotto are the remains of an extensive water garden. the channels no longer have water flowing through them.

gate

The entrance gates are made from cast and wrought iron. The ashlar gate piers are surmounted by vases topped with pineapple leaves.

Designation status: The National Heritage List for England: Listed Building Designation Grade II

planting

This feature is the Italian garden. It is a secluded garden in the south-east of the site. It is laid out formally with statuary.

planting

This featue is the Children's garden. It is a walled grassed area in the north-west. It may previously have been the kitchen garden.

lawn